[1] Natasha Jen, Storefront for Art and Architecture Spring Benefit 2019
[2] Dafi Kuhne, Various Posters
[3] VJ Type, Canopée Typeface
[4] Wkshps, Ministry of Graphic Design
[5] Ralph Schraivogel, Kammgarn Jazz Festival
[6] Forthcoming Studio, Various Projects
[7] Experimental Jetset, The Printed Book
[8] Söre Popitz, Various Projects
Pentagram partner, Natasha Jen designed this typographic identity for the Storefront for Art and Architecture's Spring Benefit in 2019. I enjoy the expressive typography, especially how the typography can vary due to the large variety of glyphs in the typeface.

[1]
Dafi Kühne is a Swiss graphic designer and letterpress print maker whose work ranges from large format posters and other printed matter such as brochures and postcards. Kühne shares that his work strives to combine contemporary graphic design with old techniques.

[2]
This week I discovered the French type foundry, VJ Type. Their work includes mostly display typefaces which are super expressive and playful, like the one pictured here called Canopée.

[3]
New York-based design studio, Wkshps, designed the identity for the Ministry of Graphic Design—the first design biennial in the Middle East. The identity spans many formats such as posters, banners and a website, all of which incorporate both English and Arabic text in order to make the identity, and event, as accessible as possible.

[4]
I love this poster by Ralph Schraivogel for the Kammgarn Jazz Festival. The texture and typography are so eye-catching, interesting and expressive. Although the typography does not appear to follow any established grid system, I still find it to be extremely legible.

[5]
Forthcoming Studio is a design studio that develops printed matter such as books and posters as well as digital media. Their projects emphasize a deep investigation of the relationship between content and materiality, which is an aspect of their work I really enjoy.

[6]
The posters designed by Experimental Jetset for an exhibit entitled The Printed Book caught my eye recently. I enjoy the way the design incorporates imagery and bold graphics to create a visual that so perfectly matches its content.

[7]
Söre Popitz was a German graphic designer, who was a student at the Bauhaus school and one of the first female designers in the advertising industry. The modernist designer is the only known female designer from the Bauhaus and was known for training under designers such as Jan Tschichold and Herbert Bayer.

[8]